Amazing Grover Cleveland Quotes

He mocks the people who proposes that the government shall protect the rich and that they in turn will care for the laboring poor.


The communism of combined wealth and capital, the outgrown of overweening cupidity and selfishness which assiduously undermines the justice and integrity of free institutions, is not less dangerous than the communism of oppressed poverty and toil which, exasperated by injustice and discontent, attacks with wide disorder the citadel of misrule.


Party honesty is party expediency.


No man has ever yet been hanged for breaking the spirit of a law.


I have considered the pension list of the republic a roll of honor.


At times like the present, when the evils of unsound finance threaten us, the speculator may anticipate a harvest gathered from the misfortune of others, the capitalist may protect himself by hoarding or may even find profit in the fluctuations of values; but the wage earner – the first to be injured by a depreciated currency and the last to receive the benefit of its correction – is practically defenseless.


A cause worth fighting for is worth fighting for to the end.


Patriotism is no substitute for a sound currency.


Officeholders are the agents of the people, not their masters.


Honor lies in honest toil.


Unswerving loyalty to duty, constant devotion to truth, and a clear conscience will overcome every discouragement and surely lead the way to usefulness and high achievement.


Loyalty to the principles upon which our Government rests positively demands that the equality before the law which it guarantees to every citizen should be justly and in good faith conceded in all parts of the land.


The ship of Democracy, which has weathered all storms, may sink through the mutiny of those aboard.


Your every voter, as surely as your chief magistrate, exercises a public trust.


I believe that the public temper is such that the voters of the land are prepared to support the party which gives the best promise of administering the government in the honest, simple, and plain manner which is consistent with its character and purposes. They have learned that mystery and concealment in the management of their affairs cover tricks and betrayal. The statesmanship they require consists in honesty and frugality, a prompt response to the needs of the people as they arise, and a vigilant protection of all their varied interests.


The United States is not a nation to which peace is a necessity.


Honor lies in honest toil.


Officeholders are the agents of the people, not their masters. Not only is their time and labor due to the government, but they should scrupulously avoid in their political action, as well as in the discharge of their official duty, offending by a display of obtrusive partisanship their neighbors who have relations with them as public officials.